February 2018 ATXConnect Print

Calling All Members

Take the Challenge!

Forget the ice bucket challenge; we have something so much cooler!  An adventure that will prove to shock you back to life and engage your brain with incredible experiences to enhance your skills or learn new ones that will be vital to your success. What could it be? We challenge you to volunteer for your Austin ALA Chapter and join a committee.

Be a hero by connecting our most valuable resources, our members and business partners, or show off your social media expertise by blogging, posting, and tweeting for the communications committee. Maybe you prefer to lend a hand by climbing, digging, donating, or walking at a community relations event or get excitement from tracking down the perfect speaker to present on a hot topic that is well received and appreciated by your colleagues. Perhaps spreading the word about ALA’s wonderful benefits is your calling and you are able to help our organization continue to gain recognition and grow with new, talented members.

Don't delay. Join a committee today!

by Karie Rivkin

 

 

This newsletter is brought to you in part by the generous support of our platinum sponsor, Avison Young.  

                                                               

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Local News, Global Impact

Black History Month: The celebration of Black History Month was created in 1926 by Carter G. Woodson, a noted African American historian, scholar, educator, and publisher. It became a month-long celebration in 1976. The month of February was chosen to coincide with the birthdays of Frederick Douglass and Abraham Lincoln

NAACP: On February 12, 2009, the NAACP marked its 100th anniversary. Spurred by growing racial violence in the early twentieth century, and particularly by 1908 race riots in Springfield, Illinois, a group of African-American leaders joined together to form a new permanent civil rights organization, the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP). February 12, 1909, was chosen because it was the centennial anniversary of the birth of Abraham Lincoln.

Heavyweight Champ: Jack Johnson became the first African-American man to hold the World Heavyweight Champion boxing title in 1908. He held onto the belt until 1915.

First Lawyer: John Mercer Langston was the first black man to become a lawyer when he passed the bar in Ohio in 1854. When he was elected to the post of Town Clerk for Brownhelm, Ohio, in 1855 Langston became one of the first African Americans ever elected to public office in America. John Mercer Langston was also the great-uncle of Langston Hughes, famed poet of the Harlem Renaissance.

Supreme Court Justice: Thurgood Marshall was the first African American ever appointed to the U.S. Supreme Court. He was appointed by President Lyndon B. Johnson, and served on the court from 1967 to 1991.

Eminent Scientist: George Washington Carver developed 300 derivative products from peanuts among them cheese, milk, coffee, flour, ink, dyes, plastics, wood stains, soap, linoleum, medicinal oils and cosmetics.

First Senator: Hiram Rhodes Revels was the first African American ever elected to the U.S. Senate. He represented the state of Mississippi from February 1870 to March 1871.

First Woman Representative: Shirley Chisholm was the first African American woman elected to the House of Representatives. She was elected in 1968 and represented the state of New York. She broke ground again four years later in 1972 when she was the first major party African-American candidate and the first female candidate for president of the United States.

Self-Made Millionaire: Madam C.J. Walker was born on a cotton plantation in Louisiana and became wealthy after inventing a line of African-American hair care products. She established Madame C.J. Walker Laboratories and was also known for her philanthropy.

Population Growth: The black population of the United States in 1870 was 4.8 million; in 2007, the number of black residents of the United States, including those of more than one race, was 40.7 million.

Oscar Winner: In 1940, Hattie McDaniel was the first African-American performer to win an Academy Award—the film industry’s highest honor—for her portrayal of a loyal slave governess in Gone With the Wind.

Into Space: In 1992, Dr. Mae Jemison became the first African American woman to go into space aboard the space shuttle Endeavor. During her eight-day mission, she worked with U.S. and Japanese researchers, and was a co-investigator on a bone cell experiment.

White House: In 2009, Barack Obama became the first African-American president in U.S. history. He occupied the White House for two consecutive terms, serving from 2009 to 2017.

NAACP: On February 12, 2009, the NAACP marked its 100th anniversary. Spurred by growing racial violence in the early twentieth century, and particularly by 1908 race riots in Springfield, Illinois, a group of African-American leaders joined together to form a new permanent civil rights organization, the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP). February 12, 1909, was chosen because it was the centennial anniversary of the birth of Abraham Lincoln.

Heavyweight Champ: Jack Johnson became the first African-American man to hold the World Heavyweight Champion boxing title in 1908. He held onto the belt until 1915.

First Lawyer: John Mercer Langston was the first black man to become a lawyer when he passed the bar in Ohio in 1854. When he was elected to the post of Town Clerk for Brownhelm, Ohio, in 1855 Langston became one of the first African Americans ever elected to public office in America. John Mercer Langston was also the great-uncle of Langston Hughes, famed poet of the Harlem Renaissance.

Supreme Court Justice: Thurgood Marshall was the first African American ever appointed to the U.S. Supreme Court. He was appointed by President Lyndon B. Johnson, and served on the court from 1967 to 1991.

Eminent Scientist: George Washington Carver developed 300 derivative products from peanuts among them cheese, milk, coffee, flour, ink, dyes, plastics, wood stains, soap, linoleum, medicinal oils and cosmetics.

First Senator: Hiram Rhodes Revels was the first African American ever elected to the U.S. Senate. He represented the state of Mississippi from February 1870 to March 1871.

First Woman Representative: Shirley Chisholm was the first African American woman elected to the House of Representatives. She was elected in 1968 and represented the state of New York. She broke ground again four years later in 1972 when she was the first major party African-American candidate and the first female candidate for president of the United States.

Self-Made Millionaire: Madam C.J. Walker was born on a cotton plantation in Louisiana and became wealthy after inventing a line of African-American hair care products. She established Madame C.J. Walker Laboratories and was also known for her philanthropy.

Population Growth: The black population of the United States in 1870 was 4.8 million; in 2007, the number of black residents of the United States, including those of more than one race, was 40.7 million.

Oscar Winner: In 1940, Hattie McDaniel was the first African-American performer to win an Academy Award—the film industry’s highest honor—for her portrayal of a loyal slave governess in Gone With the Wind.

Into Space: In 1992, Dr. Mae Jemison became the first African American woman to go into space aboard the space shuttle Endeavor. During her eight-day mission, she worked with U.S. and Japanese researchers, and was a co-investigator on a bone cell experiment.

White House: In 2009, Barack Obama became the first African-American president in U.S. history. He occupied the White House for two consecutive terms, serving from 2009 to 2017.

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Business Partner Spotlight

How would your firm survive a Catastrophe? 

A managing partner once told me, “After my people, our data is our most valuable asset.” The value of data is undeniable. Unfortunately, so is its vulnerability. Critical information can be lost due to server malfunction, hackers, power surges, broken water pipes or any one of a hundred unpredictable disasters. Data backups are important, but they may not be enough.

What Is the Difference Between Data Backup and Disaster Recovery?

In a nutshell, data backups only store the information itself. While this is a crucial step, most companies require a range of different applications to function properly. For example, imagine if your server crashed overnight. You had the foresight to back up all of your clients’ information, but you had no access to email or accounting software. Without a disaster recovery plan, your firm could come to a grinding halt.  

In cases of catastrophic damage, it can take hours or even days to get everything back online. A proper disaster recovery plan can save you thousands of dollars in lost time, revenue, and opportunity. However, your plan must be in place (and thoroughly tested) before disaster strikes.

What Does a Disaster Recovery Plan Look Like?

Every firm is different, and so is every recovery strategy. It is crucial that your plan reflect what is important to your firm. Two important concepts to keep in mind are:

  • RTO - Recovery Time Objective: How quickly do we need to recover? Does your firm need to be back online in an hour, or in 24 hours? Faster is always better, but it is also more expensive. You can also narrow this down to certain services. Typically email is more critical than closed cases for example.

 

  • RPO - Recovery Point Objective: How much data can we afford to lose? Is a day fine or just a matter of hours? We even have some firms setup where it is less than 15 minutes, but as with RTO, faster is more expensive.

 

The goal of any disaster recovery plan is to minimize RTO and RPO by bringing crucial systems back online as quickly as possible. For instance, if your company relies on email but the network is down, your plan may allow employees to start sending and receiving new emails within the hour. However, archived emails may not reappear for 8-24 hours. That’s why it is important to prioritize which programs and information are most important to your company. 

Outside of RTO and RPO, there are other key factors to consider:

  • What data needs to be protected, and how quickly does it need to be recovered?

  • What is our budget?

  • How would you notify employees or clients about an outage (if traditional communication was unavailable)?

  • In the event of a facility disaster, things become more complex. How will our employees work? From home or another location? Where can our attorneys meet with clients?

  • How often should you test your disaster plan to make sure it’s working?

Remember, the right contingency plan can make or break your business. It is possible for companies to develop the plan in house, but there are proven benefits to consulting a professional legal technology firm like Technology Pointe. We can help determine what kind of services you need, but more importantly, they can help develop a plan that will scale and grow as your firm does. 

by Dustin Bolander

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Calendar of Events

February 15,  2018      Managing Partner Breakfast at The InterContinental Stephen F. Austin Hotel Grand Ballroom

  • We are thrilled to welcome Michael S. Cohen, Esq. of Duane Morris LLP as our guest speaker this year. Mr. Cohen is a partner with Duane Morris in Philadelphia and a prolific speaker in the area of employment law. We are excited to hear Mr. Cohen present complicated employment law hypotheticals that affect many law firms and provide keen insight on how to diffuse and avoid such situations.

 

February 22, 2018      Lunch & Learn at Headliners

  • Please join us on for the Austin Chapter of the ALA's Annual Meeting and Luncheon.  We will vote for the 2018-19 officers and review chapter business. We will also have a series of round table discussions on topics that are important to our members. This month's luncheon is FREE for our members so please don't wait to RSVP!  RSVP deadline is noon on the 20th.

  

LOOKING AHEAD

March 22nd, 2018    Spring Educational Seminar

  • Topic to be announced soon!

 

April 7, 2018       Urban Roots Farm Outreach 

  •  This event has been a great success and a member favorite for the past few years. Join your fellow members and get your hands dirty! Urban Roots is a youth development organization that uses food and farming to transform the lives of young people and inspire, engage, and nourish the community. Food grown at the farm is sold at farmers markets and used by some of the top chefs in Austin. Don't miss this event!

 

 CLICK HERE TO SEE UPCOMING

  ALA NATIONAL webinars AND EVENTS

 

 

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